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Moli

Traditional threads like Moli, Black Thread, Raksha Sutra, Nazar Thread, and Satrangi Dori are used frequently throughout many cultures due to their spiritual and religious significance. Let's examine each type in more detail:

 

Hinduism uses a sacred thread called moli, also referred to as kalava or mouli. During religious ceremonies and festivals, it is typically tied around the wrist and made of cotton or silk. The moli is thought to bring luck, wealth, and protection from the bad.

 

Black thread: In many cultures, this particular type of thread is used to ward off evil and provide protection. It is frequently worn around the wrist, ankle, or neck and is thought to have spiritual powers. Traditional embroidery and sewing techniques also employ black thread.

 

Hinduism uses the sacred thread known as the Raksha Sutra. It is frequently fastened around the wrist during religious rituals and is thought to provide defence against evil spirits and bad energy. Traditionally, beads and other decorative elements are used to adorn the cotton or silk Raksha Sutra.

 

Evil eye thread, also referred to as nazar thread, is a type of thread that has been used for centuries in many cultures as a form of protection. It is frequently tied around the wrist, ankle, or neck and is thought to ward off bad luck and attract positive energy. Nazar thread is frequently woven from silk or cotton and embellished with beads, charms, and other adornments.

 

Seven-colored thread, also referred to as Satrangi Dori, is a customary thread used in Sikhism. It is tied around the wrist as a representation of the Sikh faith and is made from seven different colours of thread. Satrangi Dori is frequently given as a gift during religious ceremonies because it is thought to provide strength and protection to the wearer.

 

These particular threads are frequently used in customary rituals and ceremonies because of their profound cultural and spiritual significance. These threads continue to hold a significant place in many cultures all over the world, whether it be for protection, good luck, or as a symbol of faith.


  • Black Braided Cotton Dori Kali Suti Dori For Taviz and Religious Pooja Kalewa
  • Black Braided Cotton Dori Kali Suti Dori For Taviz and Religious Pooja Kalewa
  • Black Braided Cotton Dori Kali Suti Dori For Taviz and Religious Pooja Kalewa
  • Black Braided Cotton Dori Kali Suti Dori For Taviz and Religious Pooja Kalewa
Black Braided Cotton Dori Kali Suti Dori For Taviz and Religious Pooja Kalewa

Black Braided Cotton Dori Kali Suti Dori For Taviz and Religious Pooja Kalewa

Rs 250  / KgGet Best Price

Minimum Order Quantity: 1 Kg

MaterialCotton
Usage/ApplicationPooja Kalewa and Tawiz
ColorBlack
Size1.5 mm
BrandBobbiny, Mandala , Ajanta
Country of OriginMade in India
Commonly used in a wide variety of Indian handicrafts and sewing projects, Black Dhaga is also known as Black Thread or Black Dori. Cotton, silk, and polyester are just some of the materials that go into its production, and there are many different sizes available.
The Nazar Dhaga is another form of black thread used often in Indian culture. Many people wear one around their neck or wrist as a talisman against the evil eye because of this belief.
Black Dhaga comes in a wide variety of sizes, from very fine threads to sturdy cords. Thread thickness is often indicated by a numerical value, with larger values signifying thinner threads. A size 10 is often thicker than a size 30. Thinner threads are utilised for more delicate tasks like embroidery, whereas thicker cords are employed for more substantial sewing and handicraft.
Black Dhaga's fabric selection includes cotton, silk, and polyester. Because of their affordability and durability, cotton threads are the most popular choice. However, silk threads are more costly but more desirable because to their luxurious feel and sheen. Polyester threads are also often utilised because to their durability, abrasion resistance, and moisture resistance.
Black Dhaga has several applications and is often used in Indian textile arts such as embroidery, beadwork, and sewing. Making tassels and braids out of it is a common ornamental practise. Black Dhaga is also often utilised in rites and celebrations of many kinds, from weddings to religious observances. However, Nazar Dhaga is worn as a charm to ward off the evil eye because of its spiritual importance.
In conclusion, both Black Dhaga and Nazar Dhaga have significant roles in Indian culture and are used in a wide range of contexts, including but not limited to the arts and crafts, the sewing industry, and religious rituals. Material and thread size are application specific, with black being a popular option because to its adaptability and symbolic significance. Black Dhaga and Nazar Dhaga are still widely used throughout India, both for their practical and cultural significance.

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  • Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja
  • Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja
  • Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja
  • Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja
  • Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja
Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja

Premium Moli Dhagga (Red, Yellow) for Puja, Cotton Cord/Dori (50M, Pack-5) Thread for Puja

Rs 329  / PieceGet Best Price
Quantity Per Pack100 m
MaterialCotton
BrandSaras
Colorred and yellow
Packaging Size100 m
Length100 m
Packaging Typeroll
Country of OriginMade in India
  • The holy thread known as the Mauli, Moli, Raksha Sutra, or Kalawa has immense religious importance in Hinduism. It is a sign of safety, blessings, and good fortune. There is a widespread belief that wearing mauli around your wrist during ceremonies and happy events can bring good fortune and protect you from harm. This article will discuss the Mauli or Kalawa from India, including its origins, construction, dimensions, and applications.
  • Mauli or Kalawa: Its Historical and Cultural Significance
  • Mauli, also known as Kalawa, has been a part of Indian tradition for millennia. The custom of using the holy thread to tie a knot has been traced back to the Vedic era. Lord Vishnu and his wife, Goddess Lakshmi, are revered by Hindus as the guardians of the cosmos, and the Raksha Sutra, also known as the Mauli, is linked with them. Wearing a Mauli around one's wrist is said to ward off evil spirits and usher in a lifetime of success and fortune.
  • Kalawa and Mauli Materials and Sizing:
  • Mauli or Kalawa is often woven from cotton or silk thread. Modern-day manufacturers also often utilise synthetic threads of varying colours. Thread colours may range from white to black, although red, yellow, and orange are the most prevalent. These hues are seen as fortunate because they represent vitality, cleanliness, and power.
  • Mauli and Kalawa sizes change depending on its intended use. In a wedding, for instance, the bride and groom's hands are tied together with a longer piece of thread. A similar but smaller thread is wrapped around the wrist on other happy occasions.
  • Applications of Mauli and Kalawa:
  • Mauli, also known as Kalawa, is utilised in many Hindu rites. Common contexts for using Mauli include:
  • Festivals, weddings, and other joyous events sometimes call for the wearing of a Mauli or Kalawa, which is traditionally knotted around the wrist. Wearing a Mauli around one's wrist is said to attract good fortune and ward off evil spirits.
  • During puja, or religious worship, a Mauli is presented to the god as an offering. The thread is often wrapped around the precious object, such as a tree or statue.
  • Wearing a Mauli is said to shield its owner from harm caused by bad energy and evil spirits. Newborn babies typically have one wrapped around their wrists as a kind of protection from harm.
  • A Mauli is utilised in traditional Indian medicine in various regions. Many illnesses and injuries are said to be alleviated by simply wrapping a Mauli around one's wrist.
  • Conclusion:
  • Mauli, also known as Kalawa, plays a significant role in Hindu ritual and ceremony. It's said to prevent bad things from happening to you and bring you luck. The thread is worn around the wrist on special occasions to fend off negative energy and welcome in good fortune. You may find Mauli (or Kalawa) in a wide range of sizes and colours of cotton or silk thread. The Hindu culture continues to place a premium on its importance and usage.

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  • Satrangi Cord Dori
  • Satrangi Cord Dori
  • Satrangi Cord Dori
  • Satrangi Cord Dori
Satrangi Cord Dori

Satrangi Cord Dori

Rs 12  / PieceGet Best Price

Minimum Order Quantity: 100 Piece

Color7 Colors
PatternDyed
MaterialPolyester
Packaging TypeRoll
Usage/ApplicationGrah Pravesh or House Warming
Length20 m
Diameter10 mm
The "Griha Pravesh," or housewarming ritual, is regarded as a major occasion in Rajasthan, India. The tying of the holy "Satrangi Dori," or "seven-colored thread," is one of the most significant ceremonies carried out at this ceremony. This thread is said to bestow wealth and luck to the new house.Seven distinct coloured threads—one for each planet and the energy it represents—are tied together to form the Satrangi Dori. The thread is dyed in the following hues: white, red, yellow, green, blue, orange, and purple. A calm and successful existence for the occupants is said to result from the harmonic balance of good energy that these colours are said to produce in the home.The Satrangi Dori is wrapped around the home's front door during the Griha Pravesh ritual, with one end of the thread attached to a coconut or a piece of turmeric. The coconut is a representation of Lord Ganesha, who removes barriers, while turmeric is a sign of wealth and cleanliness. All family members in attendance at the ceremony also get the thread wrapped around their wrists.The Satrangi Dori is a beautiful feature in the home in addition to serving as a sign of luck and wealth. Satrangi Doris are often used as wall hangings, curtains, and ornamental items in Rajasthan. The thread's vivid colours offer a dash of colour to any space and improve the home's overall appeal.The Satrangi Dori is utilised at other significant occasions, such as marriages, naming rituals, and other religious events, in addition to housewarming festivities. It is regarded as a traditional and holy emblem of Indian culture, and the meaning behind it has been handed down through the ages.Overall, the Satrangi Dori is a lovely and significant representation of happiness and wealth in Rajasthan. The home and its occupants are brought into balance and harmony by its seven hues, each of which stands for a planet and the energy it represents. The Satrangi Dori continues to be a treasured and significant tradition in Rajasthan and beyond, whether it is utilised for ceremonial or ornamental reasons.
Features:
• A sacred thread made by knotting seven different coloured threads together
• Each colour represents a different planet and its associated energy
• Brings wealth and good luck to the new home
• Used in naming ceremonies, weddings and other religious events
• Tied around the front door of the house with one end tied to a coconut or a piece of turmeric
• Tied around the wrists of all family members present at the ceremony
•  
Bright colours are symbolic of luck and wealth and provide a burst of colour to any space. They are also considered to be a holy and traditional emblem of Indian culture, and their significance has been handed down through the years.• Used in naming ceremonies, weddings, and other religious events. Tied around the front door of the home with one end tied to a coconut or a piece of turmeric. Tied around the wrists of all family members present at the ceremony. Also used as a cube. Made by tying together seven different coloured threads. Red, yellow, green, blue, orange, purple, and white represent different planets and energies.

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